Invisible Genocide: Rebbot_LAddario_011

A Rohinga family, Burmese Muslims, look for small frogs to eat in the mud near their home in the camps for the Internally displaced in Sittwe,Myanmar, November 2015. The Rohingya have limited opportunities to work and support their families, and live in extreme poverty and marginalization.  An estimated one million stateless Rohingya have been stripped of their citizenship in Myanmar, and forced to live in modern-day concentration camps, surrounded by government military checkpoints.  They are not able to leave, to work outside the camps, do not have access to basic medical care, or food. Most aid groups are banned from entering or working in the camps, leaving the Rohingya to their own devices for sustenance and healthcare. Journalists are also routinely denied access to the Rohingya, Myanmar’s way of ensuring the world doesn’t see the slow, intentional demise of a population.

A Rohinga family, Burmese Muslims, look for small frogs to eat in the mud near their home in the camps for the Internally displaced in Sittwe,Myanmar, November 2015. The Rohingya have limited opportunities to work and support their families, and live in extreme poverty and marginalization. An estimated one million stateless Rohingya have been stripped of their citizenship in Myanmar, and forced to live in modern-day concentration camps, surrounded by government military checkpoints. They are not able to leave, to work outside the camps, do not have access to basic medical care, or food. Most aid groups are banned from entering or working in the camps, leaving the Rohingya to their own devices for sustenance and healthcare. Journalists are also routinely denied access to the Rohingya, Myanmar’s way of ensuring the world doesn’t see the slow, intentional demise of a population.