Healthcare, Maternal Mortality and Sexual Violence: Breast Cancer in Uganda: ADDARIOBREASTCANCERUGANDA027

Mary Namata jokes with her grandchildren outside her home, outside of Kampala, Uganda, July 20, 2013.   Mary, like so many other women in Uganda, waited months before visiting a doctor after feeling a tumor in her breast.  When she recently attended the breast clinic at the Mulago hospital, doctors surmised that her cancer would only be treatable for a time before it advanced too far to be treated with treatment available in Uganda. While Uganda was able to get a handle on the AIDs epidemic through ARV drugs and assistance from the international community, the country still struggles with how to treat and diagnose an overwhelming number of Cancer patients across the country.  Thousands are currently being treated by only a handful of trained Oncologists in the entire country of Uganda; basic chemotherapy and Cancer medicines are often in short supply or unavailable, the radiation machine is outdated, in-patient beds are limited, and most Cancer patients can not afford transportation fare to reach diagnosis and treatment in Kampala from villages across the country.

Mary Namata jokes with her grandchildren outside her home, outside of Kampala, Uganda, July 20, 2013. Mary, like so many other women in Uganda, waited months before visiting a doctor after feeling a tumor in her breast. When she recently attended the breast clinic at the Mulago hospital, doctors surmised that her cancer would only be treatable for a time before it advanced too far to be treated with treatment available in Uganda. While Uganda was able to get a handle on the AIDs epidemic through ARV drugs and assistance from the international community, the country still struggles with how to treat and diagnose an overwhelming number of Cancer patients across the country. Thousands are currently being treated by only a handful of trained Oncologists in the entire country of Uganda; basic chemotherapy and Cancer medicines are often in short supply or unavailable, the radiation machine is outdated, in-patient beds are limited, and most Cancer patients can not afford transportation fare to reach diagnosis and treatment in Kampala from villages across the country.